2018 CSA Week 1

June 20, 2018

 

 

 

Welcome to the first week of your 2018 CSA!  We have a lot of new members this year, so bear with me if the rest of you have heard a lot of this before.  It’s been a wet early summer so far, with mild temperatures and enough rain so that I am not chasing irrigation as I usually am in May and June.  The down side was that the soil was too wet for us to start planting until 2 weeks later than last year, so I find myself harvesting our first shares right at Solstice.  The weeds are crazy happy,  of course….  The good news for you all is that we will transition pretty fast from the early greens and roots you will see in the next couple weeks to more substantial mid-summer harvests.  One thing I do usually love about farming is that the variables are constantly changing, which keeps it interesting and creative!  When it’s not driving me crazy, that is….

This week then the early greens!  Arugula is a favorite, with a distinctive flavor and a slight bite that pairs well with sharper salad dressings or cheeses when cooked.  The spring mix is an early version of the salad mix that you will see throughout the rest of the season.  The cutting lettuce is slower to grow so will not make an appearance until next week at the earliest.  This mix has some arugula, a couple mild mustards, and baby kale.  Remember you can always cook greens if you are sick of salads!  The hakurei turnips are known as “snow apples” by some Alaskans, they are sweet and tender and usually don’t make it home if you have kids in the back seat.  From Japan, they are known as salad turnips because they are often eaten raw, but are also delicious sautéed.  And remember that the turnip greens are delicious and nutritious.  This is a fast-growing turnip so the greens are tender and sweet and don’t need the long slow cooking with vinegar that Southerners like with winter turnip greens.  Also in your share is choi.  We are drowning in big beautiful choi, I think I have been eating it nearly every day!  Can also be enjoyed raw or cooked, I like it best sautéed with garlic and some sesame oil and tamari as a side dish.  Use the whole plant, and you can add the green parts after cooking the stems for a bit if you want to keep things from melting too much.  You have a  live plant in your share, you can either strip and eat the whole thing now or keep it going as you harvest individual leaves and side shoots.  A sunny window sill is just fine.

Enjoy!

 

Full Shares                                                                                    Small Shares
Arugula                                                                                           Arugula
Spring Mix                                                                                      Spring Mix
Hakurei Turnips                                                                              Hakurei Turnips
Bok Choi                                                                                         Bok Choi
Rhubarb                                                                                          Rhubarb
Lettuce – Green Deer Tongue                                                        Basil Plant
Chives
Basil Plant

 

Spicy Bok Choi in Garlic Sauce
1 pound bok choy
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1/4 cup water
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger root
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
Trim off the ends of the bok choy and chop, keeping the white parts separate from the green as they will need to cook longer. Rinse and spin or pat dry. Set aside.
In a small bowl or cup, stir together the vegetable oil and sesame oil. In a separate larger bowl, stir together the water, ginger, garlic, oyster sauce, soy sauce, brown sugar and red pepper flakes. Set this aside.
Heat the oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the bok choy stems first; stir fry for a few minutes or until the pieces start to turn a pale green. When stems are almost cooked, add the leaves; cook and stir until leaves are wilted, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and transfer the bok choy to a serving dish. Pour the sauce into the skillet or wok, and set over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring constantly, until sauce has thickened slightly, about 3 minutes. Pour over the bok choy and toss lightly to coat.

 

Penne with Goat Cheese and Arugula
5 1/2 ounces goat cheese
2 cups coarsely chopped arugula, stems included
1 cup quartered cherry tomatoes
1/4 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
8 ounces penne pasta
Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until al dente.
Crumble goat cheese into a large serving bowl. Add arugula, cherry tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, and salt and pepper.
Drain pasta, and toss with goat cheese mixture.

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